Jason Hope sees real potential in deeper understanding of atherosclerosis

No one has been a bigger contributor to the tech scene throughout the state of Arizona then Jason Hope. As the founder of dozens of successful startups, Hope has single-handedly brought the state of Arizona into the 21st century, creating some of the most innovative companies that the state has ever seen.

Recently, Hope has made headlines by donating a large sum of money to the SENS Foundation, one of the leading private researchers of medical conditions in the United States. Hope donated more than $500,000 to the organization, marking one of the largest contributions that the firm has been gifted with over the last 10 years.

The funds have been earmarked for atherosclerosis research. Hope has long been interested in the medical research industry and the ability of science to uncover some of the greatest mysteries of the human body. As a close follower of the medical literature, Hope has long known that getting to the bottom of the mysteries of atherosclerosis, one of the most deadly killers in the United States today, will not only be able to directly save the life of those afflicted by the disease, but it will also be able to give serious insight into the ways in which similar diseases work.

In fact, Hope has come to the viewpoint that aging itself can be viewed as a disease process. Almost all major causes of death rapidly increase in likelihood past the age of 50. By the age of 90, almost everybody who will have live to that age will have experienced at least one bout with cancer. One of the most important underlying causes of disease related to the aging process is inflammation. Inflammation is the main driver of atherosclerosis, with the body responding to micro-injuries within the venous walls caused by deposits of small amounts of plaque. This is followed by an inflammatory response, whereby the plaque is isolated by the immune system’s machinery, and a fibrinous cap is installed over the area of damage that occurred as a result of free-floating cholesterol and other particulates in the bloodstream damaging the vessel wall.

But this is now thought to be the same process that underlies many of the other diseases associated with aging, such as rheumatoid arthritis, glaucoma and diabetes. Hope believes that his donation will help uncover the answers that scientists are looking for.

Jason Hope Info: inspirery.com/jason-hope/